Archive for February, 2021

How to Modify Traditional Store Practices to Reduce Organic Waste

National Waste Associates - Private Library - Blog - How to Modify Traditional Store Practices to Reduce Organic Waste

While most grocery chains have now implemented organics waste recycling programs to separate out this material stream and prevent it from being sent to landfill, there are many important steps that retailers can take to reduce the amount of organic waste that they produce in the first place.

Growing food requires considerable resources, energy and labor. Letting food go to waste therefore results in inflated costs and food prices, and weakens the food supply chain.
In this article, we look at a few simple store practices that can be modified to reduce the amount of organic waste that your business generates.…

6 Easy Steps to Reduce Supply Chain Waste

National Waste Associates - Private Library - Blog - 6 Easy Steps to Reduce Supply Chain Waste

While most logistics firms have implemented a comprehensive waste and recycling program, significant cost saving opportunities still exist. By analyzing the supply chain, additional savings can be found by identifying where waste is occurring and then working on how it can be designed out of the process.

With companies now often measured on their environmental performance as well as their financial capabilities, it’s more important than ever to make sure that your waste management operations are as sustainable as they can possibly be. In this article, we look at the six steps you can take to reduce supply chain waste and make a real impact on your business.…

Technologies to Minimize Waste and Save Money in Warehousing

National Waste Associates - Private Library - Blog - Technologies Grocery Stores Can Use to Minimize Waste and Save Money in Warehousing

The global warehouse market is expected to experience a compound annual growth rate of close to 6% through to 2022. Successful warehouses will be those that carefully manage their operating costs to keep margins healthy. Practices and technologies that streamline processes, reduce inventory and eliminate warehouse waste are vital to help them achieve this.

In this second article of our two-part series on improving profitability through waste minimization, we look at the technologies that can help drive significant savings in your waste, energy, procurement and labor bills.

Technologies to Minimize Waste in the Warehouse

Warehouse Management Systems

Warehouse Management Systems (WMS) provide real time tracking from the moment inventory is received into the distribution network through to final dispatch to the customer.…

Strategies to Minimize Waste and Save Money in Warehousing

National Waste Associates - Private Library - Blog - Strategies Grocery Stores Can Use to Minimize Waste and Save Money

Businesses are all seeking efficiencies in their operating processes and wise companies don’t leave waste out of the equation. In this two-part series, we look at the strategies and technologies that can help warehousing operations to drastically reduce their waste bills as well as reducing costs associated with labor, equipment and energy.

Benefits of Implementing Waste Minimization Strategies

Many companies underestimate how much waste they are producing, and the true cost of that waste on the business. Typically, the cost of waste is between 4-5% of company turnover, but it can reach as high as 10%. This means that warehouses can save hundreds of thousands of dollars by just focusing on the greatest waste reduction opportunities.…

Supermarket Organic Waste Recycling: 5 World-Class Examples

National Waste Associates - Private Library - Blog - Supermarket Organic Waste Recycling 5 World Class Examples

The United States generates over 60 million tons of food waste every year, 10% of which comes from grocery stores and supermarkets. Food waste from the retail sector represents $18.2 billion a year in lost value, and is a major source of the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute towards climate change.

  • It’s calculated that the food supply chain wastes:
  • 45% of all produce
  • 35% of seafood
  • 30% of cereals
  • 20% of dairy and meat products

In the U.S., six states and several localities have passed waste bans or waste recycling laws for food waste. Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Vermont structure their laws as organic waste bans, while California has instituted a waste recycling law that requires commercial generators of organic waste to either compost or anaerobically digest organic waste.…