"Private Library" Posts

Will Your Business Be Affected by New Recycling Laws?

Commodity market volatility, supply chain woes, plastic protests, and international trade gridlock are among some circumstances that have created a need for better recycling infrastructure and programs. The result of this has left overlapping recycling legislation on the table. Some of these changes can have business implications. The changing recycling laws include such items as:

  • Product bans
  • Bottle bills
  • Biogas
  • Extended producer responsibility
  • Waste and recycling education
  • Infrastructure investments
  • Solid waste recycling
  • Product/material bans

There’s not a one-size-fits-all solution that will solve the recycling challenges faced in today’s market; it will take a handful of complimentary stakeholder-focused policies. While there are numerous bills to keep an eye on, some core pieces of legislation represent varied approaches to tackling the longtime recycling hurdle faced by the US.…

Can Your Business Really Get to Net Zero Waste?

For the purposes of understanding Net Zero Waste, it’s important to know the business context for its need. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) proposed a rule this year that would require public companies to formally disclose climate data as a step toward providing investors with accurate climate risks to make informed financial decisions. These disclosures are based on Scope 1, 2, and 3 emissions. 

Scope 1 and 2 are more widely discussed because they are the direct, controlled, and indirect external emissions a company is accountable for, respectively. Scope 3 emissions are the indirect emissions in a company’s value chain.

Will Circular Economy and Climate Goals Transform the Waste Industry’s Status Quo?

Historically, business waste management status quo was to landfill; now, organizations are more interested in waste diversion improvements. The pace and scale of ESG reporting trends and zero waste initiatives across organizations, large and small, private and public, have initiated a greater shift toward measurable carbon reductions and landfill diversion efforts. Are these efforts changing the status quo?

Some circular economy efforts getting the most attention include organics processing, enhanced recycling technology and programs, improvements on waste-to-energy equipment, and supply chain materiality reductions. While action, ideals, and actual practices have yet to catch up, it does seem that between new legislation and stakeholder pressure on businesses to transition to a circular economy, the status quo is beginning to shift.…

Better Wise Up For Business Sakes!

Avoiding Fines for Improper Dumping of Hazardous Materials

In September of 2021, the Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office, together with 33 other California District and City Attorneys, reached a settlement for violations of hazardous waste regulations against the beauty company Ulta. The ruling followed an investigation of Ulta stores’ improper storage, handling, and disposal of hazardous and other regulated waste and inadequate employee training. The company has five stores in Contra Costa County and 161 facilities in California.

Under the settlement, the corporation must pay $439,500 in civil penalties, $250,000 in costs and $62,500 in supplemental environmental projects. The company will also be required to implement compliance assurance programs.…

The Future of Recycling Policy in the U.S.

After the COVID-19 pandemic stalled most legislative advances in 2020, 2021 has been a very busy year, particularly for state recycling legislation. The rise in activity can also be attributed to a growth in public concern and political pressure around certain high profile waste issues, together with international economic triggers, including trade decisions and fluctuating commodity markets.

As a result, lawmakers are focusing on a range of issues, from diverting organics from landfill, to chemical recycling and banning single use plastics and foam foodservice packaging.

The proposed legislation could dramatically change the way the U.S. handles recycling over the next few years, with the potential for vast improvements in infrastructure, together with advances in organics recycling, education, product bans, bottle bills and requirements for extended producer responsibility (EPR) initiatives.…